One Photo: The Beach At Pacific Beach State Park

The Beach At Pacific Beach State Park

Pacific Beach State Park sits north if Ocean Shores and is located, obviously, right on the Pacific Ocean. It’s a small state park but the whole area has a lot to offer.

This photo was taken on our first day there, shortly after we arrived. The beach is beautiful and I couldn’t pass up the perspective of these old piers lined up and heading off in the distance.

One Photo: Contributor Stones At Soap Lake, Washington

Contributor Stones At Soap Lake, Washington

Soap Lake is one of the more interesting destinations in Eastern Washington. It’s legendary waters are loaded with minerals and, to this day, many still tout their health claims.

On the shores of the lake is an impressive sculpture feature a Native American scene. Scattered around it and embedded into the surrounding cocrete are these stones honoring the contributors who made it possible. It makes for an interesting looking scene itself.

One Photo: Diablo Lake

Diablo Lake

Diablo Lake is one of the many highlights of a trip across the North Cascades Highway. Diablo Dam holds back the water of the Skagit River in its effort to create much needed electricity for the Pacific Northwest.

This photo is taken from the Diablo Lake Overlook. The turquoise water is stunning and there are scenic views in multiple directions.

Five Fun Facts About The Willamette River

Willamette River

Willamette River

The Willamette River flows north through the Willamette Valley and right past a number of notable Oregon communities, including Salem, Corvalis, Albany, and Portland. It also provides a lot of scenery and recreation along the way too.

Here is a look at five fun facts about the Willamette River.

Tributaries

There are twelve rivers that flow into the Willamette River: Coast Fork Willamette River, Middle Fork Willamette River, Long Tom River, McKenzie River, Calapooia River, Marys River, Luckiamute River, Santiam River, Molalla River, Yamhill River, Tualatin River, and Clackamas River.

Distances

The Willamette River is 187 miles long. Where it flows into the Columbia River is 101 miles upstream from where that larger river meets the Pacific Ocean.

A Lot Of Water

Though it pours into the Columbia River closer to its end than its beginnings, the Willamette River contributes about 12 to 15 percent of the total water flow of the Columbia.

The Largest!

By water volume, Willamette Falls on the Willamette River just south of Portland, is the largest waterfall in the American Pacific Northwest.

The First Western City

Oregon City was founded on the shores of the Willamette River, right at Willamette Falls. It was incorporated in 1844. This made it the first incorporated city in the United States, west of the Rocky Mountains.

Local History: Earthquake Point Between Wenatchee and Lake Chelan

Earthquake Point Marker

Located just north of the small town of Entiat and right along the Columbia River, between Wenatchee and Lake Chelan, is a historical marker that details Earthquake Point. The area is also known as Ribbon Cliff and Broken Mountain. It’s little more than a crumbling hillside and an informational sign.

Earthquake Point Hillside

Near the end of 1872, a huge earthquake hit at this spot and it caused a huge amount of debris to break away from the mountain and tumble down into the Columbia River. This is one of the major rivers of the Pacific Northwest and the entire country. Enough debris had come down that day that it actually completely dammed the river for several hours. The idea of a rock slide big enough to block the entire Columbia River is staggering.

As you look around towards the river, you can see remnants of this landslide, with rock outcroppings peeking out from the river’s water. There are even small islands left in this part of the river, all made of rock that came down during the earthquake that gave this spot its name.

Read the historical marker and take some photos. It’s pretty impressive, even with the later development that came along like the highway, railroad, power lines, and farms across the river.

Earthquake Point Marker

Earthquake Point is another of the many great historical spots to stop and see when taking a road trip through the Pacific Northwest.

Five Fun Facts About Mount St. Helens

mount st helens

Mt. St. Helens made worldwide news in 1980 when it erupted violently, killing 57 people and causing a great deal of devastation. Shortly after its eruption, Mt. St. Helens became one of the top attractions in the Pacific Northwest. In the decades since the eruption, people who live within the region, as well as those who are traveling to the area from around the country, have ventured out to see and learn as much as they can about this important natural attraction.

There is a lot to know about this incredible place to visit. Check out these five fun facts about Mt. St. Helens.

What’s In A Name?

Mt. St. Helens was named by explorer George Vancouver in honor of his close friend, and British diplomat, Alleyne FitzHerbert, 1st Baron St. Helens.

Thanks, President Reagan!

In 1982, President Ronald Reagan and the United States Congress established Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument.

On The Big Screen

The film, The Eruption of Mt. St. Helens, was made by a film crew that was dropped on the mountain just five days after the May 18, 1980 eruption. The crew became lost soon after and had to be rescued by the National Guard on May 27th.

Who Owned It?

At the time it erupted, the summit of Mt. St. Helens was actually owned by the Burlington Northern Railroad. It had been part of the North Pacific Land Grant signed in 1864 by President Abraham Lincoln.

Tons Of Ash

It’s estimated that a total of 2,400,000 cubic yards, or 900,000 tons, of ash from the eruption of Mt. St. Helens had to be removed from highways and airports in Washington State.